Subject-verb correspondence can be difficult due to the irregularity of English plural subjects; many are not marked with an “s” at the end. Even for native English speakers, subject-verb agreement can be a difficult concept to understand. There are several rules that need to be followed, and some of them only require exercise to make them familiar. Unlike “and”, you should use a singular verb when connecting two singular subjects to the following four words: the key to subject-verb concordance is to find the number of both simultaneously; Singular subjects take singular verb forms, while plural subjects take plural forms. The trick is to recognize (1) the singular against plural subjects, which is not always easy (an “s” at the end of a word is not the only sign of the plurality of subjects), and (2) to know the difference between singular and plural forms. Here`s a simple guide to understanding the subject-verb agreement once and for all. The authors of ESL may consider that the following verb must be singular, because schere refers to what is functionally considered as a single object. Scissors, such as glasses, tights, and other objects represented by Summation Plural, technically consist — or in the case of original tights — of two parts, so the object is treated grammatically in the plural: “The scissors are in the top drawer.” Authors often think that the verb should correspond to organizations, but the topic is one (with the implicit subject “an organization”), so the sentence should be, “One in four organizations report that they use this type of software.” This error is common, because although the number of organizations in the study is more than four and the sentence means that for each of the four organizations one of which used the software, the authors do not realize that the sentence should be read literally. (Essentially, it expresses that statistically, one of four organizations reports with this type of software.) When another number is replaced by one, the ratio is correct and many people do not recognize the subtle distinction. Here are some other examples of the correct use. Note that each verb is available in singular form.

See the pattern? For these five words, the prepositional sentence is the determining factor. If the expression refers to a plural idea, the verb is plural. If the expression refers to a singular idea, the verb is singular. By trying to correctly replace each subject with the singular pronoun “he” or the plural “she”, you should be able to determine whether the concordant verb should be as singular or plural. . . .